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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 153 (some duplicates have been removed)
so we can keep interest rates low so we can make sure we don't hurt our economy. >> i want to command -- commend you on the effort of people to just put out a budget. with all due respect on my friends on the other side, last year they were in majority, they chose not to do that. they chose thinking it would provide political cover. it didn't. i think that's what's gone "encore booknotes" the senate side. calculation that somehow this will spare some of our members from difficult votes. i commend you for developing a difficult budget and getting your colleagues to vote on it and it was a legitimate issue in the campaign. i think it's an appropriate place to have the discussion. you come, you vote, we go have a campaign. that helps the country clarify the issues. we move on. the house has fulfilled its responsibility in that regard in through the fire in the election. i think that's fair. the senate just simply has not. and it is discouraging. you know, it just takes 51 votes. that's all it takes over there. i actually heard commentators tell us, oh, no, it takes 60. it takes no such t
with zeros on the budget sheet we on the economy of washington, d.c. instead of the real economy. out here in charlotte, in new orleans n sleever port. we have to accept government number crunching, even conservive number crunching is not the answer to our nation's problems. we have to face another cold hard fact. washington is so dysfunctional that it will be deemed not serious by the media. it will fail in the united states senate and wouldn't maket to the president's desk where he would veto it any way. any serious propose toll restrain government decpwroth deemed non-serious in washington, d.c. the balanced budget amendment is called non-serious in washington, d.c. term limits are non-serious in washington, d.c. capping the federal growth also deemed not serious in washington, d.c. the truth is anything serious is deemed not serious in washington, d.c. when then senator obama voted against racing the debt ceiling he said he was doing so because the national debt was at an outrageous $8 trillion. i want to quote the president saying $8 trillion, that's trillion with a t. it is now over
to put his time. >> brown: well, you know, he spoke about the economy, getting the economy right first and foremost. he said "more than ever foreign policy is economic policy." did that sound right to you? >> i think that's right and i think this is a man who's grown up, really, in the political military side of foreign policy and national security and i think one of the challenges will be for him to recognize that the economic instrument in trade is really very important. if you look at asia, the coin of the realm in asia is trade and economics and, you know, if we're going to have a rebalancing toward asia, it needs to be an economics and trade overwhelmingly. so he's got, i think, a real opportunity to help lead the administration in using all of our instruments for national power influence, particularly economic and trade. >> brown: what do you think -- i mean, i know what you think about -- we talked about this in your last book about the need for economic thinking, i guess, changing the way we think about the world. but do you think that the administration has understood that wel
hadley and zbigniew brzezinski weigh in. >> brown: paul solman looks at china's fast growing economy and asks, is it headed for a crash? >> wages are rising for the burgeoning middle class, but for hardscrabble factory workers: mounting protests against livle wages d woing conditions. >> ifill: and vice president joe biden hangs out with hari sreenivasan on google plus to talk about gun violence. >> make your voices heard. this town listens when people rise up and speak. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: the u.s. military has a new order of the day: working up plans for putting women on the front lines. the process was se
economy, which is completely manageable. this has shot up dramatically and it's going to continue to shoot up under current policies. the evidence is very clear in academic literature. it's very clear in international observation. there comes a point where your debt in terms of your economy reaches leve a level in which ct markets become noticeably disturbed and you become very worried. and if it's -- rising interest rates which then spread throughout the economy. mortgage rates and consumer rights and so forth. this is a certainty, and it is the path we are on that will have extreme consequences that we are not used to think about in this country spend i asked the question how much time do we really have. you know, with the u.s. per person debt now 35% higher at. wendy think we face our greek moment -- when do you think we take our greek moment to get our fiscal house in order? >> right now we are having good news-bad news situation. the good news is that despite all that we have done wrong, we're still one of the safest places in the world to invest. there's a lot of places around the wo
by bloomberg, 36% said america's fiscal woes are the biggest threat to the world economy, more than the 29% who named the european debt crisis. anthony mason is attending a meeting of world bankers in davos, switzerland. >> reporter: how strong do you think the u.s. economy actually is right now? >> i think the u.s. economy wants to be strong. >> reporter: but mary callahan erdoes says the bickering in washington is holding it back. erdos is one of the most powerful women on wall street. as c.e.o. of j.p. morgan asset management, she presides over $1.2 trillion in investments. >> the u.s. has to realize it's got so much going for it. let's just get ourselves to come together as a team, one team running that country, helping to get itself back on stable footing which then cascades to the rest of the world. >> reporter: how much does it hurt the economy if we don't confront this? >> it hurts us tremendously. it hurts the confidence of the u.s., it hurts the confidence of the c.e.o.s to know how do i invest? what are the rules going to be? and we've got to get back to believing that business is go
economy and is going to create jobs and increase the standard of living for hard- working, middle-class americans. you know, we talk so much about mortgaging the future, mortgaging our children's future and i care deeply about that. but frankly, we are mortgaging now the future is now. and we all -- all of us here, we want to fight. we want to fight for that nurse, that carpenter, that teacher, that grand parent, that parent, that student, we want to fight for everyone across this country. and the 113th congress has been sent here i think to be do big things, the hard things, and this is the first step in that process. no budget, no pay. >> questions? >> speaker boehner, yesterday in the president's inaugural address he suggested that immigration and climate change will be top priorities for him. what do you think of his call for action on climate change, and is immigration a high priority? >> there are a lot of priorities for the congress. a lot of priorities for the president. and right now, the biggest issue is the debt that's crushing the future of our kids and grandkids. hard
. a lot of them have to do with the economy. fix the economy. create jobs. then there's stop spending. and then of course probably the most important that he will talk about tomorrow, compromise, work together. >> chuck todd, thank you very much. >>> let me bring in the rest of our roundtable here. joe scarborough is here from msnbc's "morning joe." adviser to obama 2012, david axelrod. chief foreign correspondent richard engel is here, safe and sound in studio. richard, it's great to see you in person this morning. "new york times" best-selling author of "team of rivals" doris kearns goodwin. in between awards shows she's joined us. and nbc news special correspondent tom brokaw. welcome to all of you. tom, that's where we tee it up. the president, as he begins a second term, very difficult climate in washington and very real expectations. >> yes. and i was looking at those top three priorities for the american people. and they all fit into his single most difficult task, it seems to me, both conceptually and specifically. in the next couple of years, he only has a couple of years, th
water. billions in the economy. at chevron, if we can't do it right, we won't do it at all. we've got to think long term. we've got to think long term. ♪ a talking car. but i'll tell you what impresses me. a talking train. this ge locomotive can tell you exactly where it is, what it's carrying, while using less fuel. delivering whatever the world needs, when it needs it. ♪ after all, what's the point of talking if you don't have something important to say? ♪ >>> we're back. political director and chief white house correspondent chuck todd will take us inside the numbers of the latest poll as you tee up the second term, chuck. >> four years ago, enormous expectations for president obama. there were a lot of people, hope and change was big. this time, call it pragmatic hope as far as the public is concerned. as you see here, just less than 30% believe they're going to evaluate president obama with a clean fresh slate. 64% will evaluate him based on past feelings. and here, a continuation of a trend we saw throughout the first term. very similar to what ronald reagan dealt with dur
with their best strategy and the outcome for both the market and the economy. don't go anywhere. more "money" coming up. ♪ twins. i didn't see them coming. i have obligations. cute obligations, but obligations. i need to rethink the core of my portfolio. what i really need is sleep. introducing the ishares re, building blocks for the heart of your portfolio. find out why 9 out of 10 large professional investors choose ishares for their etfs. ishares by blackrock. call 1-800-ishares for a prospectus which includes investment objectives, risks, charges and expenses. read and consider it carefully before investing. risk includes possible loss of principal. lori: all right. back to business in washington now republicans hold a big vote to whether or not to extend the debt limit until may. if congress doesn't pass a budget by april 15th they no longer get paid! i have no problem with that. our panel is here with their take on the strategy. we have our favorite economist, peter morici. the always amazing scott martin, chief market strategist with united advisors and former democratic congressman
of the ongoing drought is having on the u.s. economy and food prices. plus, your e-mails, phone calls, and tweets. washington journal live at 7:00 a.m. eastern on c-span. >> one of the key themes, of course, for any exhibition on the civil wars are the abolition and e mans nation. we are fortunate that they came of age what they did. between the two of them, they make issues around e mans passion and abolition. issues around human rights and american freedom on a general nonrace specific level. ly go through every piece of include that johnson puts in the picture. i'll summarize by saying for you pay attention to the top half as well as the bottom half. what you get is a white cat in the bedroom window and dark skin black woman holding a child. there's a ladder and a fabric coming out the other. there's a way in and out without being seen. there's a rooster up here. roosters have a habit in the evening of finding a perch and calling to the hen to spend the night with them. the hen is on top of the slave quarters. if you add up of the little ins and outs and look down here at the white girl enteri
the country faces which is getting our economy going. >> sean: i like what our colleague charles krauthammer said it's an ode to big government and you pointed out in the list, gun control, gay marriage, global warming, he not only wants to lock in every liberal agenda item, but advance it further. will he be successful? second term are notoriously not successful. >> let's add global climate warming on her, climate change. we've already passed this through the congress. it's done. is congress going to pass it? is congress going to tell the states, no, you can't put that past voter i.d. laws? only in it's bipartisan doesn't require amnesty and citizenship. gun control passed, no. i think the president was basically declaring his administration is no longer substantive achievement. it's make the democratic party and making the republicans look more extreme. taking their strength to pass positive items that pile up over in the senate never to be really considered, but give them an agenda, a view that says to the american people he's over there worried about gun control. we're worried about gett
soros said that he was not impressed with stimulus uppers to fix the global economy. -- effort to fix the global economy. >> most of the top has been about the global economic malaise. it is the home of the world economic forum based in the height of switzerland and year. the main focus has been on the eurozone and whether or not there are any green shoots of recovery. >> more than 1000 delegates have taught here over the course of five days for the ways to kill them. bill of the dream was resilient dynamism. there is plenty to plenty of resilience a little dynamism the added value is for global leaders from the public and the private side to get together and exchange ideas. people come back from here, a batteriesed,, loaded. >> the form called for an unprecedented $14 trillion dollars to make environmentally friendly. without decisive steps to protect the plan, sustainable growth cannot be guaranteed. >> the other big prices is the referendum on the european union and the crisis in the eurozone. it ranged high all week. they set out their visions for economic recovery. >> as my colle
'll tell what you, if the economy keeps getting better over the next three years, you've got hillary linton rclin running three years from now, we republicans have such a major headwind in our face for the next three years. it's going to be tough. >> yeah, there's no question. but there's so many variables. >> go ahead. >> no, so many variables that could happen in the next 3 1/2 years. >> yeah. ed sees you making a motion, he stops. >> i was trying to get richard haass in on this. >> she wants some more 'roids. >> andrea, i'm sorry, we cut you off. >> no, there are other points about the politics of it. joe biden is going to be at the white house, in closed meetings with the president today and has had a very high-profile role. clearly, this is the interview that he would have wanted to see. and when you talk to a lot of leading democrats who were in town this weekend, they were saying that joe biden has everything going for him except that hillary clinton is a woman and is a celebrity and has the best popularity. and she has the virtue, after eight years then of barack obama and the obama
to not be part of that, because it is terrible for the economy and seems to be bad politics. host: white house press secretary jay carney. let's hear purcellville in broken arrow, oklahoma, republican. what is your advice to republicans for the second obama administration? caller: i love c-span and i am so glad that you have this live call-in talk show from individuals all over the world. my question is, to the republicans, i know that you heard in the inaugural speech to the word "to gather." we have to come together. together we stand as we the people. i know and hope that our president of the united states, president obama, is hearing our voices this morning being back in the white house for and other four years. i am a military mom. i want to say this to the republicans. please work with our president of the united states. he is the general in chief for all of us. is gettingely on who more. we can ask. we can write letters. we can twitter and all the settings. but we have to come together. he is the one we voted for. as we let's work together the people. that is my answer to the republican
great economies throughout the world trying to continue colonialism or imperialism or whatever you want to call it. zogby to pull back, take care of the u.s. -- we need to pull back. we are shortchanging the u.s. host: this is more from yesterday, secretary clinton giving her assessment. [video clip] >> we live in a dangerous and incredibly complicated world now with very different forces at work. state-based and non-state. technology and communication. i am older than the president. i don't want to surprise anybody by saying that. >> not by much. >> i remember some of the speeches of eisenhower as a young girl. you have got to be careful. you have to be thoughtful. you cannot rush in especially now where it's more complex than it has been in decades. so, yes, there are wicked problems like syria, absolutely. we are on the side of american values, freedom, the aspirations of all people to have a better life, to have the opportunity we are fortunate to have here. but it's not always easy proceed exactly what must be done in order to get to that outcome. so i certainly am grateful for the
class voters, at a time when the economy is going through a very complicated, difficult moment when it's not clear how to get back to growth, he's thinking creatively about how to use the strength of his state to build on its weaknesseses. and i think at the national level that's what conservatives have to do. to some extempt, it's being done. i would say the policy agenda that has to come at the end of that conversation is not fully worked out by any means, but the questions are being asked. i think the direction of thinking has been helpful even in the wake of the election. if you listen to what people like marco rubio or paul ryan have been saying, it's different from what they themselves were saying six months ago, a year ago. i think the focus is turning to the right place. that doesn't mean that he'll persuade the public, but it certainly helps to ask the right question if you're looking for the right answer. >> where joe, i want to bring up something that my friend john podhoretz mentioned, and i say that carefully because reihan salam, my name has up been butchered by others, s
. and a lot of republicans say it poisoned the waters. when you look at the agenda now, there's the economy, the deficit, gun control, immigration. what should the president do first to show republicans he's not looking for revenge or looking to pick fights? >> i would say the budget. to make an honest attempt on both sides to try to reduce spending or reduce the growth in spending. that to me is the one place where there is enough on the table that both sides can make progress if they want to. you get into gun control, i basically support the president's program, but he's not going to get very much support at all among republicans for that. that's a good political point for him, but i don't see it going anywhere. as far as the illegal immigration or making it legal or whatever, reform, i would say there's an opportunity, people like marco rubio, for instance, and others, and also you have the chamber of commerce, you have some republican vested interest. i would say the budget and immigration are the two areas, spending and immigration. >> can he get through some simple things on gun contr
state of the economy. it looks like now things are almost reversed in a way. tell us about your conversation with cameron. >> when i interviewed prime minister cameron here in new york and he was sort of in the lion's den because he had thrown down the gauntlet with this speech about britain's position in the european union. britain is not fully in in terms of it is not part of the eurozone. it doesn't have the euro but in many aspects it is in and it is a full member. united states depends on britain for the very strong role in international affairs. it helps all over the place whether in trying to confront iran, syria and north korea with sanctions and plays a big role whether afghanistan, iraq. david cameron is saying we like our foreign role. we like you and our economic role in the e.u. but we don't want to be a part of your political role. he is trying to negotiate a half in/half out role for the u.k. that is very concerning to the u.s. because he has raised the stakes by saying he would put it to the british people in the referendum. if they vote to get out of the e.u. th
and the overall shape and direction of the economy. could you speak to that? >> i for started talking about it two years ago. -- i first started talking about it two years ago. i started talking about what was possible with oil. i was a lone wolf in the woods at the time. since then, the bandwagon has loaded up. a lot of other people are saying, yes, it could happen, and it to be very important for america. particularly as it translates from energy to the general economy. there are more pillars' out there, housing, manufacturing -- they depend on recovery. the one that does not is energy, because the international demand is already there. it has been created by china, india. all around the world. the weakened cash in on that. would not have to wait on it. -- we can cash in on that. we do not have to wait on it. we need to keep doing what we're doing. it is going to mean a tremendous amount of jobs. we have seen that all through the midwest. north dakota is certainly a huge example of it. they say now there is to% and unemployed -- 2% unemployed there. we cannot find those folks. [laughter] we're s
nonpartisan testimony that when the debt is this large in comparison to the economy, it costs the country the equivalent of about one million jobs. think about that. if washington got its debt and spending under control, one million more americans will be working today. and if that wasn't sobering enough, fitch ratings recently warned that the failure to come up with a plan for reducing our debt would likely still result in a downgrade of the u.s. credit rating. a lower credit rating is sure to mean higher interest rate. that meansigher credit card rates, higher student loans, certainly higher mortgage payments. despite these warnings, the democrat-controlled senate hasn'troduced a budget in 1,300 days, four years without a budget. how can we begin to get our debt under control when democrats won't even produce a budget this bill is the first step in forcing democrats to put forward a budget so we can start holding washington accountable for its out of control spending. every day, american families have to make decisions abtheir household finances. they have to adjust their spending to co
to the reconstruction of the south economic he and the revitalization of the content economy, which all of america relied on. the industrialization of many parts of the south. all of these things continued into the 20th century up to the dawn of world war ii. we do not know how many african americans found themselves back in a world of being bought and sold, but there is more evidence about this existing than many historians realize are wanted to confront. hundreds of thousands of people were bought and sold. thousands and thousands of african-american men and some african-american women died under horrifying circumstances. this was a system that relied on fatality and starvation and intimidation and a more fertile kind of involuntary servitude than what preceded it. it became a weapon of terror and intimidation to force african- americans from exercising their civil rights and intimidating them into compliance with the other kinds of explicative liver that we know more about. the repercussions of all of that are still with us. the legacy of that economically and educationally is very much somethi
, of the global economy and also for us in europe, um, is free trade. we have, unfortunately, a lot of protectionist tendencies in the world today. when we met at the g20 meeting outlined this time and again and impressed this on us, and we need to do everything we can in order to contain these protectionist tendencies. the doha round, the world trade organization has not, unfortunately, developed in such a positive direction as we wished. so in the future, too, unfortunately, we need to pin our hopes on financial trade agreements. and germany, i can promise you, will be very proactive as regards the conclusion of such fha agreements. we've now given the mandate for a free trade agreement with japan, with canada. we're shortly before conclusion of an fta with the -- [inaudible] states. we urgently need to come to such agreements. and after decades of failed attempts, we would like to do this with the united states as well, develop such a free trade agreement with the european union. quite often cultural exports are a bit bit of a hurdle here on bh sides, but i think we need to do, w
as we think about the economy of the united states coming and as you point out, the other developing countries around the world. one of the efforts of this administration has been to promote business advocacy abroad for domestic businesses at home. i led a trade mission to india about a year and a half ago with a number of businesses from new and church, and they talked about how important it was to have that support from the state officials in india as they were looking to try to establish those business relationships. can you talk about how you might continue that and continue that this is something you would be focused on an unwilling to continue to support? >> well, as i said in my opening, i think foreign policy is increasingly economic policy, and we have an undersecretary for economic affairs, economics, energy etc.. i think that the state department historical use to have a foreign commercial service back in 1979. it slipped away. i think the secretary had the time -- i think that is something we ought to be doing in a very significant way. obviously working with the treasury
night. alex. >> okay. thank you so much for that. >>> let's go to the economy, more signs it's on the upswing. u.s. stock markets approaching record highs, the dow on track for its best january performance since 1989. the s & p closing above 1,500 for the first time in five years. nasdaq also closing higher. but there could be pitfalls to the good news. >> the stock market winning streak marked its fourth straight week and this week, encouraging signs on jobs and higher home prices, the government reported homes of new sales shot up in 2012. home sales up almost 14%. diana covers real estate for cnbc. >> home building definitely improved in 2012. nowhere near we need it to be. running at half the housing starts we would be in a normal year. only . >> any improvement is good news for this custom home building outside of columbus, ohio. they haven't been this busy since the housing bubble burst in 2006. >> we're very excited. last year was good, expecting this year to be great. >> reporter: the dow has finished each yoear higher than it began. it is poised to set a new record h
change and those solutions will both help keep our families safe and help our economy grow at the same time. >> okay. there you have it. what do you say to that? >> i say you look at the literature. we know a study in journal of nature show 60 years no trend in droughts and there was a decline in the u.s. except for the most recent one in 2012 which wasn't even as big as one in the 1950s or 1930s. in terms of flood, 80 to 117 years, no trend in floods. hurricanes, eight years now with the longest period without a major landfalling category 3 or larger hurricane in that eight years since 1900 we've gone that long. if you start looking at these measures -- >> answer me this point. you wouldn't dispute there's been increased acceleration in c02, right? >> james hanson from nasa indicated flat lining temperatures. the movements have shifted to extreme storms. that's the focus. evidence is everywhere when you look at extremes. bottom line is we always had extreme weather. in the 1970s, the cia report and "newsweek" and people worried about coming ice age blamed extreme weather. droughts and
and a stable economy as a means to security and stability. i think the concerns are many. the concerns are around africa com in 2008 at a time when africa surpassed the middle east in its supply of oil to the united states and the concern of the u.s. of africa and oil and a vital resource is the true rationale for africacom, as well as countering china in that theater where china is increasing its influence. the concern was heightened before africacom was heightened. concern has grown over time. is there any effort to evaluate africacom? i understand your stepping down as a new commander steps in. there has been a congressional hearing on benghazi, but clearly there is a bigger issue at stake and that is u.s. foreign-policy with regards to africa. thank you. >> thank you. it will not surprise you that i disagree with most of what you said, which is ok here k. we live in a country where you can do that. it is true that the state department has the authority for security assistance matters. some of that 8-9,000,000,000 dollars that is spent in africa does in fact go to security assistanc
going to hurt the economy. how would this hurt the economy? >> i don't see how discouraging speculation, which is almost all done with borrowed money. they effectively borrow money at a rate of 30 to 1. you put 3% down and borrow the rest of the money. i don't see how this hurts the economy. and if we reduce this volatility and reduce market distortion, we can get back to having a market focused on investments that create production in the future and wealth in the future, not creaming the market today through speculation. >> quickly, you think this is something congress could embrace? >> not probably in this congress in the house, but i think this is an idea. it's been around for 80 years. we may well see come about, ed, and hopefully we. we need speculators, but we don't want them to be overwhelming the market. >> all right, david cay johnston, thank you for your time on the "ed show." that is "the ed show." i'm ed schultz. thanks for joining us tonight. the rachel maddow show starts right now. good evening. >> geek, rachel. your e block in particular was stellar. i want you to meet te
% of the entire budget of the government. at a time when the world is getting smaller, our economy depends on its relationship with every other country in the world's comment we face a more global markets at any time in our history. not just in my briefings at the state department, but in my conversations with business leaders and in my trips to crisis areas, to war zones, refugee camps, and in some of the poorest countries on earth, i've been reminded of the importance of the work our state department does to protect and advance america's interests and do the job of diplomacy and a dangerous world. i think there is more that can be done to advance our economic capacity and interest. in this debate and in every endeavor, i pledge to work closely with this committee. not just because it will be my responsibility, but because i will not be able to do this job effectively without your involvement and your ideas going forward. thank you, mr. chairman and members of the committee. i know there is a lot of ground to cover. >> [inaudible] [indiscernible] >> when i first came to washington and testified,
, what did you learn? >> we need cuts, we need more revenue, but equally, we need growth in the economy. letting start-ups, tax reform, and regulatory reform help. that's what we need more. >> you really think we need more? >> i mean, you want to make fun of -- >> i don't ever make fun of playing. i like my politicians who play. and who have cameras around when they do. what did you learn today, sam? >> you picked your clothes by number. i have no idea. the sweater collection could probably use an upgrade. >> this is number 47 right here, by the way. >> this is the hollywood business sweater, right? >> that's right! >> i learned about super fierce sri lankan women fighter, and victor garber is wonderful, and my neighbor. which is great. >> if it's way too early, harold, what time is it? >> it's time for "morning joe". >> but coming up next -- >> is my man, chuck todd on "the daily rundown". >> no, luke. >> luke russert! >>> taking it to the streets, vice president biden heads into virginia to make the case for new gun law. can a campaign-style push pressure congress to get something don
of the american economy by that. but also very clearly having a pathway to earned legalization is an essential element, and i think that we are largely moving in that direction as an agreement. >> what do you want? senator mccain said it's helpful that president obama is out on the road. what do you want to hear from him? how committed is he to getting this done? he also wants gun control. >> right. well, i was at the white house on friday with the congressional hispanic caucus leadership, and the president made it very clear in that discussion that this was a top legislative priority for him in this session of the congress and that he expects to work with all of us in an effort to achieve the goal, and he's fully committed to it, and i think that's why this week he starts the clock by the speech he's going to make out in las vegas. >> and that pathway to citizenship, that has to be in there? >> absolutely. latino voters in -- first of all, americans support it in poll after poll. secondly, latino voters expect it. thirdly, democrats want it, and, fourth, republicans need it. >> shouldn't the
was just circumstances, the economy wasn't bad enough to fire obama and the republican party, its brand was still being dragged down with the association through the financial crisis in iraq and sundry other leftovers of the bush years? >> i think the clearest way to look at this is to look at 2010. 2010 was a resounding rejection of what obama had done in the first two years. it was a resounding rejection of the inintrusiveness expansion of the government. it essentially was a referendum on this kind of hyper liberalism and a referendum on the question of the size, the scope, the reach of government, and it was kind of a pure ideological election, because there were no personalities involved. you weren't voting for a president, you weren't voting up and down on a figure, you were voting on issues. and the don't instant -- dominant issue was obama, was the increase in spending, was essentially the expansion of government. or to put it a more abstract and grand way, the relationship between citizen and state which obviously was tilting towards state. so -- and there when the question is
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 153 (some duplicates have been removed)

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